Medicare Part A, B and D have late enrollment penalties.

What’s the Part A late enrollment penalty?

If you aren’t eligible for premium-free Part A, and you don’t buy it when you’re first eligible, your monthly premium may go up 10%. You’ll have to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you could’ve had Part A, but didn’t sign up.

Example: If you were eligible for Part A for 2 years but didn’t sign up, you’ll have to pay a 10% higher premium for 4 years.

What’s the Part B late enrollment penalty?

If you don’t sign up for Part B when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B. Your monthly premium for Part B may go up 10% for each full 12-month period that you could’ve had Part B, but didn’t sign up for it. If you’re allowed to sign up for Part B during a Special Enrollment Period, you usually don’t pay a late enrollment penalty. See page 17.

Example: Mr. Smith’s Initial Enrollment Period ended December 2016. He waited to sign up for Part B until March 2019 during the General Enrollment Period. His coverage starts July 1, 2019. His Part B premium penalty is 20%, and he’ll have to pay this penalty for as long as he has Part B. (Even though Mr. Smith wasn’t covered a total of 27 months, this included only 2 full 12-month periods.)

What’s the Part D late enrollment penalty?

The late enrollment penalty is an amount that’s permanently added to your Part D premium. You may owe a late enrollment penalty if at any time after your Initial Enrollment Period is over, there’s a period of 63 or more days in a row when you don’t have Part D or other creditable prescription drug coverage. You’ll generally have to pay the penalty for as long as you have Part D coverage. Note: If you get Extra Help, you don’t pay a late enrollment penalty.